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Saturday 28 December 2013

A question from Debb VanDelinder about special use of scanners

I received this mail from Debb. She, and I, hopes that someone can answer her question :

I'm wondering if you or anyone in the scanography site might know where I can get a scanner that either works in an upside down position or how or modify a scanner for inverted use? I'd really like to make some images in this position but my scanner doesn't work if I flip it. I read that their are modified scanners for use in heb scanning but can't come up with how they did this. Thanks for any direction you might be able to provide. I really need to figure this out. I have a couple of older scanners I could hack if someone has some clear directions. Of course if someone would just sell a reasonably priced version that would be optimal.

Debb VanDelinder

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Friday 16 September 2011

The first book about scannography

Nardelli Verlag publishes the first book completely devoted to the technic of scannography. And to the Art of Werner Abel.

You discovered Werner's work two months ago on scannography.org. You can now discover it in this book. It's in german but the images are universal !
Umschlag.indd

Really, this book ist not to flip, but to swing open - like a scanner or laptop. Read this book and you never will see the nature as before. You will explore the nature in a completely new way. Enjoy it! While walking with his dog through the nature, the author, the German artist, Werner Abel, reflected on itself by collecting all what he found in fauna and flora: flowers, blossoms, leaves, grains, fruits, vegetables. Arrived at home, he scanned the found pieces with a customary flatbed-scanner.

The results have been very surprisingly and fascinating. Abel was deeply impressed. He suddenly could see details which he never have seen before and which the human eye commonly does not register. Depth of focus, quasi 3-D, from the middle to the edge. No Digicam can do this…

Reading this book, regarding the wonderful subjects captured by the scanner you can explore the beauty of the nature in a wondersome matter. Enjoy totally new insights into the nature, look inside the flowers, leaves and things. Explore details as close-up which you just have let uncared heretofore. This book facilitates a new way of looking closely. Hints to arrange your found pieces on the scanner included. Extra-Service: Scanartists from all over the world are presenting their most beautiful, impressive and stunning subjects. What a book – surprisingly, precious, different.

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You can go on the Nardelli website to learn more.

Sunday 21 August 2011

Marsha Tudor's workflow

[Marsha|http://www.scannography.org/artists/Tudor-Marsha.html is participating on our site since a long time (well not that long as I created the site in april 2008).

She is now proposing a page where she explains her way of working. She gives lots of details, so this is an interesting page for newcomers to our media. It is also interesting as it allows to compare our own technics with hers. Don't miss it…

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Sunday 26 June 2011

How many amongst us have managed to find a publisher ?

After a chat with Patri, I was just wondering if publishers, somewhere in this amazing world have had the courage to publish a book about scannography. I see that sometimes books use scannography for their image content (more and more when flowers or plants are concerned). I also see that sometimes books about new technics of capturing images or processing images, have a chapter that gives a place to our technic. But how many books are now devoted to scannography.
Being in France, I may miss lots of things that happen in the rest of the world, so if you can share your knowledge.
By the way, we have a page called "bibliography" on the site and it may need an update.

So please send me whatever book you know that is a real scannography book…

Monday 20 September 2010

Photoshop User - an issue that talks about scannography

PhotoshopUser is THE Photoshop "HowTo" magazine. The september 2010 issue contains 8 pages about scannography.

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I'm very glad that Linda Zacks, Clare Nicholas and myself were invited to talk about our way of using a scanner. Here is how this featured pages are presented : "How many of you out there have a scanner sitting on your desk? (That’s exactly what we thought.) So when’s the last time you used that scanner? Well, if you’re anything like the following three artists, then you answered, “I’m using it right now.’’ A lot of people will tell you that scanners are for digitizing photographs and slides, but that’s only partof the story. Scanners have the capability to capture just about everything around you — one man’s trash could be that one element that’s missing from your next assignment. Throw in some paint, sandpaper, crayons, paper and other art supplies, and you’ll be creating unique and awe-inspiring illustrations and designs in no time."
Clare Nicholas talks more of flat objects that can be used in a recomposed image, Linda Zacks scanns about everything and reuses these elements in her creations. I explain how I compose my own images. PhotoshopUser is a great magazine that gives lots of tips and tricks, it is only available for members of the National Association of Photoshop Professionals (NAPP).
If you go to the website of the NAPP, you can even ask for a free issue…


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Wednesday 11 March 2009

Liquid painting with a flatbed scanner : Jaime Ruas

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Jaime Ruas is a spanish graphic designer and painter.
We added a page in the technic part of our site where Jaime explains his very special technic of painting.

Jaime has build a special box in which he can mix, paint, add liquids while scanning. He explains : "This box allows many different techniques to paint in it, without damaging the normal operation of the scanner. The different techniques used in this box are over thirty. Amongst them, you can make collages with damp paper, pencils, watercolors, acrylic paints, wax, adhesive tapes, inks, fabrics, wood, metal, and can paint with brushes, sponges, or even with bare hands, the possibilities of artistic creation is endless."

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I hope that his revealing of a special method will give others the idea to try and find new directions to develop this artform. Thank you Jaime…

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Wednesday 4 February 2009

Playing with light : Jens Standke

A german scannographer joined our community…

Jens Standke is experimenting lots of different ways of creating images. One of those ways is scannography. But, as for all his other artistic researches, he doesn't go the common path. As he explains "I examine the relationship of time, movement, reflections and visual perception. "
His scannogaphies are essentially a play of movement and light and the result is some strange forms, like ghosts that suddenly become very real and consistant. With a usual camera capturing light effects is something that is completely blurred. With the scanner, on the opposite, you have sharpness on each moment the light is captured. So these are unusual images and, the more, really appealing to the eyes.
Movement, light, reflection is the basis of this serie, but Jens also did some portraits that you can discover on his page on "scannography.org"

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Saturday 6 September 2008

Le "Blog Photo Scope"

The french "Blog Photo Scope" presents the "scannography.org" site

blog-photo-scope
The superb french site has given us the opportunity to give information about scannography. This site talks about any interesting domain of photography and presents artists and galleries… The main site has a lot of entries getting in the photographic domains through different aspects. Even if you don't read french there are some superb galleries to visit and discover french artists… Vincent is working hard on this site and it deserves success.

Saturday 30 August 2008

Wikipedia - finally a good result

Thanks to Scot Alexander, the scannography page on Wikipedia looks great now !

Finally we arrive on a consistent page. This is an encyclopedical article, well structured, with references, and keeping a minimum external links. Scot Alexander rewrote the whole article based on Patri's first researches and thanks to her help in searching bibliographical sources. Scot Alexander added a lot of elements and enriched the whole.

wiki-by-Scot

The only thing missing now, in my opinion, are some good examples of images.
To add such images, they have to be added in Wikipedia's Creative Commons. That means that you allow anybody to use this image you uploaded there, without having to pay any rights to you. You remain the author but allow the image to be reused in any possible manner. So if some amongst you are ready to do so, I think that would help improve the article. Scot added one of my images I gave out there. I'm now working on a french translation of Scot's article…

Friday 15 August 2008

What scanner do you use ?

I wanted to start this from the beginning. It is now time !! I wish to compare what kind of scanner we use to do our scanns. Here under you will find a list of questions I would like you to answer.

An example of the differences between scanners. I scanned this insect (lucanus cervus) with 2 different scanners and you can see the result is very different :
lucanus-servus-quato-Xfinity
This one is with the Quato X-finity and covered with white paper. Not much depth of field but a good color depth.

lucanus-servus-epson1670
This one is with the Epson 1670. Greater depth of field ! But I reworked the colors and contrast on that one…


Here is the questionnary in 16 points :

Please copy the questions and answer them on a mail to me

1. How many scanners do you own ?


2, What trademark and what model is it ?


3. What is the maximum resolution of it per inch (dpi) without interpolation ?


4. Is it enough for your scannography works ?


5. Do you know how much depth of field it has ?


6. Do you know what color depth it has ?


7. Is it a 3-pass or 1-pass scanner ?


8. Is it CCD or CIS ?


9. Do you use it unconventially (like not letting it on a flat surface, taking it outdoor…) ?


10. Do you use external light to enhance your scanning ?


11. Are you protecting the glass when scanning objects ?


12. How do you clean the glass ?


13. Do you rework your scanns or do you use the image as it comes out once scanned ?


14. What software do you use to rework your images ?


15. What kind of computer to do you use ?


16. Is there anything specific you want to add about your material ?